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The Ficus

The Ficus
The Ficus
The Ficus
The Ficus
The Ficus
The Ficus
  • Perfect for indoors
  • Sensitive to temp
  • Easy to sculpt (wire)

The Afra

The Afra
The Afra
The Afra
The Afra
The Afra
The Afra
  • Low level watering
  • Great communicator
  • Tough to sculpt (wire)

The Elm

The Japanese Elm
The Japanese Elm
The Japanese Elm
The Japanese Elm
The Japanese Elm
The Japanese Elm
  • Perfect for beginners
  • Needs time outdoors
  • Easy to sculpt (wire)

Bonsai Care

The Ficus

The Afra

The Elm

The Tea

What's bonsai really about?

Bonsai is reported to be millennia old and stems from the ancient Chinese art of penzai: artistically formed miniature landscapes. Japanese Buddhists took a particular interest of the cultivation techniques used to grow miniature trees and set in motion what would grip both Japan and, in time, the rest of the world: The art of bonsai.

The art focuses on creating or caring for miniature trees that mimic the shape and scale of full size trees in nature. Some aim to replicate nature like-for-like, whereas others prefer to push the limits of these techniques to see how far nature will allow them to go.

Without question, the most important aspect of bonsai is you. Its beauty alone is enough to impress any bystander but for you as a viewer, it stands as a testament to reflect what it takes to raise a bonsai: patience, learning and resilience. 

How does it help me?

Being around plants and nature in general can have a tremendous impact on ones wellbeing. More specifically, with regard to bonsai and plant cultivation, the short answer is that it actually helps both mental and physical health.

Your mind houses the personality and characteristics of someone truly important, so its vital we're doing everything we can to simulate the mind in the right way. Bonsai can really compliment a mind that's incredibly focused, as well as a more care free spirited mind which makes it an incredibly strong hobby to adopt.

We're massive advocates of taking steps to support and influence positive mental health. To learn a little more about our work and read up on some of our articles exploring positive mental health through the art of bonsai, take a look at our blog and charity page.

Pets and bonsai 

Our love for animals of all kinds led us down the path of ensuring all our trees are pet friendly. That said, despite all our bonsai being listed as non-toxic, feasting on a bonsai tree for lunch is still probably going to give a pet or two an upset stomach.

There are common types of bonsai and house plants out there (Ficus Ginseng and Jade - Crassula ovata) that can be deadly to pets. Getting hold of information like this can be a long drawn out task if you're not familiar with the scientific name of the species. 

Our Afra bonsai, despite its staggering similarities to the common Jade houseplant, actually forms part of salads and soups in southern Africa - although we'll withhold our opinion on its taste for now. To summarise: All our bonsai are safe for the house and non-toxic, just keep them out of your pets reach anyway. 

A little more detail on what's what...

The Ficus

The Ficus (Ficus Retrusa) can be found in the tropics across the world so its need for a warm climate makes for the perfect indoor bonsai. It's incredibly popular as a first time bonsai, being hardy as well as forgiving, and can develop beautiful roots that fall down from the branches, burying themselves in the soil.

One of the great things about the Ficus is that they can tolerate lower light levels, perfect if you're struggling for positions. It's a member of the fig family and, overall, highly recommended for new starters in the world of bonsai.

The Ficus
The Ficus
The Ficus
The Ficus
The Ficus
The Ficus

The Afra

The Afra (full name 'Portulacaria Afra' and otherwise known as the 'Dwarf Jade') is a drought resistant succulent from the dry regions of South Africa. If the plant has been subject to a drought, white flowers occasionally blossom around autumn time.

Cuttings and leaves from this tree can sprout roots easily so creating a small forest of these is within reach because they grow remarkably fast when they're being looked after. 

It's great starter bonsai for those who may be away from home and unable to commit to a daily care schedule. 

The Afra
The Afra
The Afra
The Afra
The Afra
The Afra

The Elm

The Japanese Elm (Zelkova serrata) is known for its hardiness and is naturally deciduous, meaning they naturally shed their leaves in the autumn and winter to prepare for dormancy until spring arrives. That said, when they're kept indoors and become stabilised with their surroundings, they can keep their leaves all year round and only shed those they're looking to regrow.

Native from northern Japan, this is one of the more popular first bonsai. It's great all round and responds well to pruning and sculpting with wire. Just make sure you've got a home for it outside in the summer months.

The Japanese Elm
The Japanese Elm
The Japanese Elm
The Japanese Elm
The Japanese Elm
The Japanese Elm

The Ficus (Ficus Retrusa) can be found in the tropics across the world so its need for a warm climate makes for the perfect indoor bonsai. It's incredibly popular as a first time bonsai, being hardy and forgiving, and can develop beautiful roots that fall down from the branches and bury themselves in the soil.

One of the great things about the Ficus is that they can tolerate lower light levels, perfect if you're struggling for positions. It's a member of the fig family and, overall, highly recommended for new starters in the world of bonsai.

View Ficus Packages
The Ficus
The Ficus
The Ficus
The Ficus
The Ficus
The Ficus
Section

Bonsai and the mind

To understand a little more about bonsai and its impact on mental health, check out some of our blogs below or explore our mental health for more information.

Don't forget, these are in fact real trees and every tree is unique, just like you and I. Therefore, expect there to be variation in appearance when your tree arrives. There will be many trees like it but your one is yours. One of a kind.

The importance of taking
a break with bonsai

Managing stress using
plant cultivation

Our Selection

Having trailed a wide range of tree variants, putting them under different environmental strains and pushing those that would (in theory) thrive indoors, we feel that the Ficus, Afra and Japanese Elm are the best pick for indoor bonsai.

Their hardiness and tropical heritage puts them a head of the pack and present themselves as a diverse group to get started with.